August 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: August 2021 Issue


“It’s like ‘what does he get out of it?’ Nothing, except that he wants to help people.”

– Donor Jackie Tian on Leon Feingold,
unpaid co-founder of House of Good Deeds

It wasn’t fair. Leon Feingold and Yuanyuan Wang had been engaged for less than a week when Yuanyuan found out she had terminal metastatic cancer.

But as devastating as that news was, something happened that made the situation more bearable: people helped. A lot of people.

Friends and family swiftly stepped in to get Yuanyuan medical care, to fly in her family from China, and even to plan a 300-person wedding in 7 days.

Many people would have succumbed to bitterness after such a cruel twist of fate. Not Leon. Five years on, he’s still focused on honoring his late wife’s legacy, and on repaying the kindness the couple was shown in her final months.

You can read more about Leon’s colossal effort to pay that kindness forward in this month’s issue. His story is a vivid reminder of what unites us as philanthropists: we all feel a duty to show gratitude for what we’ve been given—even if we can’t all volunteer 80 hours a week like Leon.


 

 

 

Rack of clothes

 

Leon Feingold Can’t Stop Paying It Forward (Christian Science Monitor) – A personal tragedy inspired one New Yorker to start the “pop-up charity” House of Good Deeds. Now he works 80-hour weeks for free to bring his neighbors what they need.

 

 

A woman shushing

 

Should All Your Giving Be in Secret? (Gospel Patrons) – Gospel Patrons founder John Rinehart on why Christians should talk about their giving, despite the risk of indulging in self-seeking.

 

 

Yellow haze over a city

 

A Donor’s Guide to Afghanistan’s Complex Humanitarian Emergency (Center for Disaster Philanthropy) – Here’s how you can help the people caught in the middle of the country’s volatile political crisis.

 

 

Stock on a laptop

 

5 Surprising Benefits of Donating Stock to Charities (Donate Stock) – Erase your capital gains tax liability with a smart giving strategy that’s gaining popularity.

 

 

A para-cyclist racing

 

A Special Team of Refugees Is Making History at the Tokyo Paralympics (SBS News) – Six athletes with disabilities are inspiring the world after overcoming conflict and oppression to participate in the games.


 

Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

May 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: May 2021 Issue


“This person barely knew me, and yet he wanted to help me.”

– Former Uber driver Latonya Young on her shock after a passenger offered her financial support to go back to school

The $150 tip was welcome. But it was the other thing her Uber passenger left her that really made a difference in Latonya Young’s life: his phone number. That passenger, an Atlanta estate manager named Kevin Esch, would go on to give Young not just more financial support, but also the encouragement she needed to re-enroll at Georgia State and finish her degree.

Their story is a reminder that even the most mundane moment could be a chance to show someone extraordinary kindness, and to wind up with a meaningful friendship in return.


She Wanted to Finish College. Her Uber Passenger Made It Possible. (Washington Post) – When Kevin Esch entered Latonya Young’s car, they were strangers. One 30-minute ride later, they’d begun a life-altering friendship.

Elon Musk’s $150 Million Charity Spending Spree Came Out of Nowhere (Recode) – Until recently, the Tesla founder had a thin philanthropy record. Suddenly he’s issuing massive grants for Texas schools, a climate contest, and more.

Faith-Based Investing Is Getting Easier (New York Times) – Letting religious tenets guide your portfolio used to be “a great way to lose money.” Now specialty firms are making it simpler without sacrificing returns.

A Flood of Junk Is Hurting Goodwill Stores (Associated Press) – Well-meaning donors have inundated the nonprofit with low-quality items during the pandemic. Now disposal costs are taking a toll.

Opinion: Now Isn’t the Time to Mess with Donor-Advised Funds (Bloomberg Tax) – Some want new rules to force DAFs to give faster. But philanthropy adviser Jeff Hamond says the funds are already working as intended.


Elon Musk photo by Dan Taylor / Heisenberg Media via Flickr; all other photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

February 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: February 2021 Issue


“When we say may God protect everyone from this virus,
we mean everyone.”

– Jordanian lawyer Laith Aamer on why he supports including Syrian refugees in his country’s current round of vaccinations

What compels a country to vaccinate recent refugees ahead of its own citizens? Maybe it’s the same thing that makes a Texas furniture store owner open the place up so locals have a warm bed to sleep in—duty, kindness, compassion, grace. Whatever it is, let’s hope philanthropy as a whole can ensure those qualities remain plentiful in a moment where so much else is scarce.


12 Ways To Share Generosity With Your Family (National Christian Foundation) – Here are some ways to help get your children or grandchildren involved in your giving, whether they’re young kids or grown adults.

When Texas Was In Crisis, a Furniture Store Owner Stepped Up—Again (Washington Post) – With people freezing and the power grid failing, “Mattress Mack” did what he does in emergencies: he fired up the generator, readied the beds and sofas, and opened his doors to hundreds in need.

Here Are the Top Takeaways From the Philanthropy 50 (The Conversation) – Three experts share their takes on the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s recent list of top 50 givers. Is Mackenzie Scott rewriting the rules of the game?

Refugees In Jordan Can’t Believe They’re Already Getting the Vaccine (Christian Science Monitor) – Jordan isn’t letting “vaccine nationalism” stop it from inoculating one of its most vulnerable populations.

How Will Philanthropy Keep Evolving in 2021? (National Philanthropic Trust) – Less restrictive grants, more diverse perspectives, better tech—here are the trends NPT’s CEO believes will carry over from philanthropy’s wild past year.


Photos from Unsplash

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

January 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: January 2021 Issue


“You’re not the same man you were. Let’s do this together.”

–Michael Radler to his formerly wayward son Alex, who now helps Michael run the charity 4Africa

Even as we settle into 2021, the uncertainty remains—what should we expect the coming year to look like? In this month’s issue we look backward for clues and forward at predictions. But our first story also reminds us that no matter what the future holds, some things remain beyond doubt: that faith brings clarity, that family is forever, that selflessness is the only route to life’s richest rewards.


How a Father and Son Found Healing 8,000 Miles From Home (National Christian Foundation) – Alex Radler used to call his wealthy father to bail him out of jail. But their work in Africa helped them discover another kind of calling.

Who Won The 2020 Philanthropy Awards? (Inside Philanthropy) – A new class of billionaire mega-donors. Fresh ideas for addressing inequity. These awards spotlight the most important trends in an earth-shaking year for philanthropy.

5 Ways Refugees Helped Battle COVID-19 in 2020 (UNHCR) – Some made medical supplies. Others made music. All year long refugees around the world did their part to keep their communities healthy and hopeful.

Could We See A V-Shaped Recovery for Volunteering? (The Nonprofit Times) – Volunteer levels collapsed when the pandemic hit. But there’s reason to think we’re headed for an all-out volunteering renaissance this year.

Dear Elon Musk: Here’s How You Should Donate Your Money (Vox) – The newly minted “world’s richest man” recently asked Twitter for philanthropy advice. Here’s what he needs to know.


Photos from Unsplash

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

December 2020

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Friends in Philanthropy: December 2020 Issue


“I said to myself: ‘Well, game over. We gave it a good shot but we won’t have a program without our volunteers.’”

–Adam Porter, Meals on Wheels director for the nonprofit Sound Generations, on his reaction to stay-at-home orders in March. Though struggling, the program remains active.

Looking back on the year in philanthropy, it’s clear the pandemic made Americans open not just their wallets, but also their hearts. Acts of kindness came from unexpected places, like the little girl whose friendship bracelets paid for PPE $3 at a time. But even as donations soared, nonprofits struggled, with volunteering plummeting just as need took off. The outlook for 2021 is extremely uncertain, but one thing is for sure: too many people are counting on philanthropy for any of us to declare “game over” now.


Americans Are Giving More Than Ever to Charities. Is It Enough? (Christian Science Monitor) – Giving broke records in 2020, but volunteer help evaporated. Can nonprofits survive this strange moment of both abundance and scarcity?

6 Reasons to Donate Stocks (Charity Navigator) – Serious tax benefits. Fewer processing fees. If you’re used to cutting checks to charities, you might be surprised to learn about the advantages of giving securities.

How a 7-Year-Old Raised $22K for the Children’s Hospital That Cared for Her (Chicago Tribune) – When Hayley Orlinsky of Chicago heard doctors and nurses needed help buying PPE, she got to work. Thousands of friendship bracelets later, she’s still going strong.

What Life Is Like Inside the “Ethnic Theme Parks” Where These Refugees Resettled (New York Times) – The Kayan people—known for their distinctive neck rings—fled Myanmar for Thailand in the 1980s. Soon they were living tourist attractions.

2020’s Most-Read Bible Verse: ‘Do Not Fear’ (Christianity Today) – Searches on the YouVersion Bible app shot up 80% in 2020. Here’s the verse people were most drawn to in a turbulent time. Plus: trends from around the world.


Photos from Unsplash

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.