April 2022

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Friends in Philanthropy: April 2022 Issue


There are many reasons you might want to start a family foundation, from establishing a lasting family legacy to giving back after a successful career. But one reason that sometimes goes overlooked is the chance it gives you to educate your family’s younger generations.

By involving children and young adults in your foundation, you can teach them about leadership, generosity, and even financial management. Here’s a look at how family foundations draw in their successors.

If you’re intrigued by the idea of starting a family foundation, you definitely don’t want to miss the first link below. There we take a much closer look at the signs a family foundation might be right for you. We also cover some potential alternatives, and some next steps you can take if you want to know more.

Click below to read the full guide!


Family on beach at sunset

7 Signs You’re Ready for a Family Foundation (and 4 You’re Not) (Friends in Philanthropy) – Read our new guide to see whether your goals and circumstances point toward starting a family foundation—and what your other options are if not.​

A 40-Year High in Inflation Is Eating Away at Charities (Philanthropy Roundtable) – Soaring prices are causing need to skyrocket at food pantries and shelters. But they’re also forcing cutbacks in service.

He Won a €200M Lottery. Now He’s Giving It Away Anonymously. (Euronews) – A retiree in the south of France says he’d rather “protect the living” than buy sports cars. Here’s what we know about the mysterious figure’s new environmental foundation.

3 Philanthropy Trends We Learned From Fidelity’s 2022 Giving Report (Forbes) – Giving is surging, even as donors get more sophisticated about their strategy. Here’s what Fidelity Charitable found by analyzing 175,000 giving accounts.

Philanthropy Doesn’t Work Without Faith-Based Organizations (Philanthropy Roundtable) – Faith-based organizations represent the largest subsector of giving and some of the most active volunteer forces. So how do we keep them healthy?


Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualified investment professional before making any financial decisions.

February 2022

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Friends in Philanthropy: February 2022 Issue


Say you’re browsing a nonprofit’s website and notice a “4-star” badge icon from Charity Navigator. You know that’s a signal that the organization is trustworthy. But what specifically is that rating telling you?

For one thing, it tells you the charity genuinely stands above the crowd. As the chart above shows, well under 50% of charities earn 4 stars from that particular site.

But if you want to truly understand how to interpret that rating and others like it, there are a few more questions you need answered. What factors do ratings sites consider? How do they get their info? And how can you actually use their ratings to make better, more informed decisions?

In this month’s issue we present the first of a two-part series on using charity ratings as a donor. Click the first article below to find out all about a resource too many givers rely on without ever fully understanding.


Four Stars

The Ultimate Guide to Charity Ratings for Donors: Part 1 (Friends in Philanthropy) – When a nonprofit touts its 4-star rating on Charity Navigator, what does that actually mean? Find out in our brand new guide to using charity ratings to make better informed decisions. (Look for Part 2 next month!)

A child in a rusty boat floating on dirty water

Just 14 Cases: How NGOs Have Nearly Eradicated Guinea Worm Disease (Nature) – The disease once infected millions in Africa. But a 40-year effort by the Carter Center may eliminate it—if officials can solve one more tricky problem.

Open Bible on a dock

Does God Care Where We Give? (National Christian Foundation) – What does the Bible say about how you should direct your support? Here are 6 principles to consider.

A neon light question mark

“Do They Still Need Our Money?” Wrong Question! (Stanford Social Innovation Review) – When a charity lands a major grant, donors often wonder if it “still needs” support. But foundation director Kevin Starr says they should think more like investors than patrons.

A child's wheelchair

How an Afghan Refugee Is Keeping Kids with Disabilities in Classrooms (UNHCR) – His own disability nearly denied him an education completely. Now Jamil ur Rehman is making sure refugee children in Pakistan have the wheelchairs they need to get to school.


Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualified investment professional before making any financial decisions.

November 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: November 2021 Issue


“Are you sure Abraham? You sure you don’t want a Playstation?”

– Miriam Olagbegi, mother of a 13-year-old boy who used his
Make-a-Wish request to feed the homeless

Abraham Olagbegi deserved to spoil himself. The 13-year-old boy from Mississippi had spent the past year battling a rare blood disorder so serious it required a bone marrow transplant.

But when Make-a-Wish came calling, Abraham surprised everyone with his request: he wanted to fight hunger in his community by organizing a monthly free meal for the homeless.

But despite forgoing a tropical vacation or a chance to meet a celebrity, the Olagbegis don’t see their unusual wish as a sacrifice. They even plan to turn the idea into a permanent nonprofit, already dubbed “Abraham’s Table.” “It’s just so rewarding,” says his mother, Miriam.

As we head into the Christmas season, this month’s issue reaffirms a central tenet of philanthropy: that giving is its own reward.


Stacked cans of food

Why a Teen Boy Used His “Make-A-Wish” to Feed the Homeless (CBS News) – Abraham Olagbegi could have asked for a Playstation. Instead he set up Abraham’s Table—and he’s just getting started.

Tax documents

What You Need to Know About Making Charitable Gifts in 2021 (Bloomberg Tax) – From donating appreciated assets to bundling your gifts, these tips will help you get the maximum tax benefit you deserve this year.

A bitcoin

Who Wins When Cryptocurrency Donations Soar? (ABC News) – Bitcoin gifts are skyrocketing in 2021. But nonprofits are flummoxed by the extreme volatility of the crypto market, where a donation can lose half its value in a flash.

A mosquito

The Malaria Vaccine Is a Big Deal but Not a Silver Bullet (Wired) – After 30 years in the works, it’s finally here: a malaria vaccine. But there are still serious obstacles to driving down a yearly death toll of 400,000.

Firefighter putting out a fire in a burning car

VIDEO: Can Science Explain What Drove These Carnegie Heroes? (60 Minutes) – Running toward a burning car. Donating a kidney to a stranger. Could these heroes’ selfless acts be linked to a highly active empathy center in the brain?


Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

October 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: October 2021 Issue


“We’ve been very close to missionary doctors. . . . They’ve taught us how to become better Jews.”

– Businessman Mark Gerson on why he and his wife—both observant Jews—support Christian missionary hospitals in Africa

Some people might find it odd that a rabbi and her Jewish husband would give $18 million to support Christian-provided medical care. Not Erica and Mark Gerson.

To them it makes perfect sense. For one thing, the Talmudic emphasis on loving the stranger means they’re open to working with anyone to do the greatest possible good. For another, they see their donation as a simple acknowledgment of the facts on the ground.

“It’s not that we wouldn’t fund Jewish missionaries, but there are no Jewish missionaries,” Erica told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. “We were looking to fund whoever can save lives in the most effective way.”

This month’s issue is a reminder of how powerful it can be when givers focus on the mission above all other concerns—and what rewarding relationships that attitude makes possible.


A blue church building

Meet the Jewish Couple Funding Christian Missionary Hospitals in Africa (Jewish Telegraphic Agency) – She’s a rabbi. He studies the Torah. Here’s why they gave $18 million to fund Christian-provided medical care.

Tax documents on a table

How to Make the Most of Year-End Charitable Giving (Wealth Management) – The tax landscape has changed dramatically for donors over the last two years. Don’t let 2021 end without considering these tips.

The number "100%" written out

How One Couple Ramped Up to 100% Giving (National Christian Foundation) – Roy and Joyce Mullen vowed to give away 1% more of their income each year. But a windfall and the CARES Act made them accelerate their plans.

Volunteers packing bags

What Will Happen to the Mutual Aid Groups The Pandemic Inspired? (AP News) – Highly informal aid networks helped people with food and rent when crisis struck. Now many are wondering: do we shut down, or ramp up?

Children in Africa holding a camera

From Inside a Ugandan Camp, One Refugee Gives Others A Voice (Christian Science Monitor) – Refugees’ stories are often told by outsiders. But now James Malish’s Facebook page gives them a direct line to the world.


Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.

August 2021

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Friends in Philanthropy: August 2021 Issue


“It’s like ‘what does he get out of it?’ Nothing, except that he wants to help people.”

– Donor Jackie Tian on Leon Feingold,
unpaid co-founder of House of Good Deeds

It wasn’t fair. Leon Feingold and Yuanyuan Wang had been engaged for less than a week when Yuanyuan found out she had terminal metastatic cancer.

But as devastating as that news was, something happened that made the situation more bearable: people helped. A lot of people.

Friends and family swiftly stepped in to get Yuanyuan medical care, to fly in her family from China, and even to plan a 300-person wedding in 7 days.

Many people would have succumbed to bitterness after such a cruel twist of fate. Not Leon. Five years on, he’s still focused on honoring his late wife’s legacy, and on repaying the kindness the couple was shown in her final months.

You can read more about Leon’s colossal effort to pay that kindness forward in this month’s issue. His story is a vivid reminder of what unites us as philanthropists: we all feel a duty to show gratitude for what we’ve been given—even if we can’t all volunteer 80 hours a week like Leon.


Rack of clothes

Leon Feingold Can’t Stop Paying It Forward (Christian Science Monitor) – A personal tragedy inspired one New Yorker to start the “pop-up charity” House of Good Deeds. Now he works 80-hour weeks for free to bring his neighbors what they need.

A woman shushing

Should All Your Giving Be in Secret? (Gospel Patrons) – Gospel Patrons founder John Rinehart on why Christians should talk about their giving, despite the risk of indulging in self-seeking.

Yellow haze over a city

A Donor’s Guide to Afghanistan’s Complex Humanitarian Emergency (Center for Disaster Philanthropy) – Here’s how you can help the people caught in the middle of the country’s volatile political crisis.

Stock on a laptop

5 Surprising Benefits of Donating Stock to Charities (Donate Stock) – Erase your capital gains tax liability with a smart giving strategy that’s gaining popularity.

A para-cyclist racing

A Special Team of Refugees Is Making History at the Tokyo Paralympics (SBS News) – Six athletes with disabilities are inspiring the world after overcoming conflict and oppression to participate in the games.


Photos courtesy of Unsplash.

Kinship United often posts content and opinions that are of interest to the philanthropic community that supports Kinship United’s mission. Nothing published by Kinship United constitutes an investment recommendation, nor should any data or content published by Kinship United be solely relied upon for any investment, tax, legal or financial decisions. Kinship United strongly recommends that you perform your own independent research and/or speak with a qualifying investment professional before making any financial decisions.